New book for Advent and Christmas

Just in time for Advent and Christmas: “Something new to say”. Christmas messages and reflections for thinking people in the 21st Century; realistic expressions of “spirit and faith” for post-Christians, Progressive Christians and evolving christians – and all who see the sacred in the every day.

“Bronwyn’s words are more powerful and real than a thousand theological treatises on incarnation” – Rev Dr Margaret Mayman

Order from my website: Words of Spirit and Faith

These prayers, affirmations, reflections and blessings are in inclusive language, with an emphasis on “faith not belief”, and social justice.

The title comes from a Christmas Day reflection led by Bronwyn: “Every year, in manses and studies and at the kitchen table, preachers and worship leaders approach Advent with a mixture of joy and trepidation. Joy, because Christmas is the penultimate Christian festival—each week the excitement builds, every week another candle is lit, every year is pregnant with possibilities—but trepidation, because December 25 after December 25, the person leading the service tries to find something new to say!”

This book is ideal for progressive and liberal faith communities and churches; lay and ordained worship leaders will find them especially helpful, and there’s plenty for individual contemplation and enjoyment, too.

Order and buy online

 

Finally with family

We arrived at Ulsan KTX Station, Eonyang in the late afternoon, and were met by son-in-law SG, his mother and his two sons (our grandsons). So wonderful to see them for the first time since they moved to South Korea at the beginning of 2018.

Halmoni (son-in-law’s mother, Korean for “grandmother”) took us straight to her home where she gave us snacks and drinks, and left us to spend time with the boys while she prepared a stupendous Korean-style meal for us!

Daughter arrived by bus from her work teaching English at UNIST, in time for hugs and tea. We ate as much as we could, from a table covered in bowls and dishes and platters Korean-style, with far more food than 8 people could get through.

The grandparents’ home, which we nicknamed “the mushroom house”, is an unusual style even for Korea, and was originally built as a summer restaurant. Halmoni spends a lot of time picking mushrooms on the nearby mountain, which she on-sells to the local market.

The boys, aged 5 and 3, loved the puzzles we brought with us.

300 kph on KTX!

We stayed the night at the Grand Hyatt Hotel – and it was very grand! Lovely young trainees on Reception using their best manners and English, and a great shuttle service from, and back to, Incheon Airport in the morning.

(Above centre & right: the view from our hotel window looking out towards Incheon airport – to left of picture)

From the airport we caught the subway into Seoul station, already bustling with people; not sure if it was a normal weekday or if the annual trek to spend Chuseok holidays with family had begun. We had our first experience of ultra sweet food at Berries and Beans cafe, and wished we’d chosen one waffle or pastry each instead of one of each…

Soon, we were on the KTX speeding at 300 kph from Seoul to Ulsan! We were going too fast to take good photos!

Only two hours to travel the distance between Wellington and Auckland. Bliss! Although the scenery was less interesting than we’d anticipated.

From Kapiti to Eonyang

Our trip began with the flight from our hometown of Paraparaumu Beach, Kapiti, to Auckland. We’d chosen to support Chathams Air who are providing flights since Air New Zealand pulled out of Kapiti and other provincial domestic services.

This meant a long wait at Auckland airport. Luckily we found the fantastically comfortable Strata Lounge, where for just under $60 each, we had comfortable seats, delicious fresh food – salads and veges to die for! – free WiFi and last-minute iPad charging, and showers if we’d needed them. Although the charge was for 3 hours we didn’t get kicked out and were able to relax there until it was time to board our 1:00 am flight to Hong Kong, en route to South Korea.

Can’t remember much about the HK stopover.

At Auckland airport there were signs around the place asking for patience while they upgrade the facilities. They need it! Without the Strata Lounge it would have been a very uncomfortable wait.

More from Incheon!

South Korea: Ulsan

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Bamboo Forest: one of my favourite places we’ve visited in South Korea. It’s part of a huge park in Ulsan. We got to the bamboo part via a gourd tunnel!

About 10 types of bamboo were labelled, and it was really peaceful to wander along the paths…

…until people began striding through on their way to work, with loud music from iPods etc, and the public address system started, with its mixture of cheesy advertising, schmaltzy 60s pop music and occasional classical tunes. 

Such contrasts in this country that seems to have “grown up” too fast; there’s a lot of glitz and a lot of dirt, strict social hierarchies and cartoonish kitsch. We learned you have to take your shoes off before going indoors because the streets and pavements are filthy and never cleaned.

 

 

 

 

 

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