Stitching inspired by mosaic art

I’ve always loved silver birch trees with their intriguing bark and silvery trunks. I’ve included them in tapestries, along with pines and other trees, but it was a mosaic image I found on Pinterest that stayed at the back of my mind for a year or more while I worked on other projects.

Now I have time to work on them, my Silver Birch Forest series is up to #8 completed and another one (or maybe more) planned.

You can see the evolution of my ideas and fibre artworks on my Current Projects page, Silver Birch Forest series.

“Rainbow Trinity” in Q-Spirit blog!

I’m thrilled that Kittredge Cherry has included one of my prayers in her blog about “Trinity,” the last image in Doug Blanchard’s gay Passion of Christ series: Trinity Sunday: Holy Spirit blesses same-sex couple as Gay Passion of Christ series ends.

You can find “Rainbow Trinity” and other inclusive, progressive liturgical writing on my Words of Spirit and Faith website. You might also enjoy the prayer I wrote for Transgender Remembrance Day.

While you’re there, check out the music by Amanda Udis-Kessler written especially for my hymn, “Faith of Metaphor and Mystery” which has a version for same-sex and mixed raced weddings.

You can download the score and recording (free) from Amanda’s Queer Sacred music website.


Kittredge Cherry, founder at Q Spirit is a lesbian Christian author who writes regularly about LGBTQ spirituality. She holds degrees in religion, journalism and art history. She was ordained by Metropolitan Community Churches and served as its national ecumenical officer, advocating for LGBTQ rights at the National Council of Churches and World Council of Churches.

photographs © Bronwyn Angela White

Too many chokos

Gave a bag of chokos and other greens to friend, who offered me recipes for them.

It’s okay, thanks.

We’ve had chokos in stir fry, in soup, roasted, steamed, in chutney, in lasagne… just don’t like them! This year, they weren’t ripe in time to use as a base for relish or jam.

Husband’s brother sent us 3 a few years ago; we ate one, planted the others, and now every year up they come, prolific as convolvulus, along the vege garden’s wind break, sheltering the passionfruit vine, through and over the huge hydrangeas and creeping up to tangle in the fig tree.

Last year when husband was trying to get rid of loads of them (even the food bank and the Sallies refused to take any more), I was with my daughter in Queensland, where a single choko cost $1 in the supermarket. I laughed and laughed.

We’re just so happy to give them away!

PS Don’t get in touch to ask for some. We think the season’s over—for this year.

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